Segmented Google Analytics Audiences: Your Pandora’s Box to Remarketing

Segmented Google Analytics Audiences: Your Pandora’s Box to Remarketing

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

What are your customers doing on your website the first time they visit? Are they looking at specific pages? Putting items into a cart, but not following through with the purchase? Maybe they’re reading your Contact page, but not getting in touch.

That’s ok. Most website visitors don’t become customers right out of the ‘Pandora’s Box,’ so to speak. To convert their interest into a sale, they will need to return to your site.

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Getting Started with Google Remarketing Audiences

Getting Started with Google Remarketing Audiences

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

 

Buyers rarely make a purchase the first time they visit a website, so getting them to return to yours is crucial to making the sale. Remarketing is one of the most effective and inexpensive ways to do this.

To get started with your remarketing campaign <link to long theme article>, you will need:

  • Google Analytics, to identify who will see your ads; and
  • A Google AdWords account.

Some Rules / Caveats of Google Remarketing (Check these Before you Start)

  • Google requires an audience of at least 100 users over a 30-day period.
  • Your Google Analytics and Google AdWords accounts must be linked together so Analytics can pass the audience members to AdWords.

Now, let’s begin by setting up your first Google Analytics remarketing audience.

Google Analytics Remarketing Audience Setup

By default, Google will display your audience to be ‘all users’ who visit your website. However, you do not have to enable this audience.

All Users Audience

  1. Log into your Google Analytics account.
  2. On the ‘Home’ page, follow the left navigation panel to the bottom and select ‘Admin’ (it will have a gear wheel icon next to it).
  3. In the middle column (Property), select ‘Audience Definitions.’
 

4.  From the Audience Definition drop down, select ‘Audiences.’

5.  Create your first audience’ screen will open.

By default, Google will create your first audience and name it ‘All Users.’ It’s an audience that captures every user that lands on any page of your website.

 

6.  Open the dropdown menu under ‘Audience Destinations.’ If your Google AdWords account is linked to your Google Analytics account, you will see your AdWords account listed. Select it, and click ‘Enable.’

To ensure your audience was successfully created, select ‘Audience’ on the Admin main page.

Now you’re ready to set up your remarketing campaign in your Google AdWords account.

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Remarketing: Those Ads That Follow You Around The Web

Remarketing: Those Ads That Follow You Around The Web

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

How Remarketing Can Work for Your Business

 

We’re all used to seeing ads online, but do you ever feel like a particular ad is chasing you? You visit a site, and then it seems everywhere you go online, you’re seeing ads for that site.

Well you are, and it’s because the site owner is using an extremely effective and inexpensive marketing technique called ‘remarketing’.

How Remarketing Works

When you visit a website for a business that uses remarketing, the site will drop a ‘cookie’ (small piece of code) into your browser. As you travel around the web, that code is matched (more…)

The Clicks Google Analytics Does Not Report

The Clicks Google Analytics Does Not Report

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

Google Analytics does not report all clicks… unless you “tell it to”.  Google Analytics is built to track website page changes, meaning when a visitor goes from one page on your site to another.

But what happens when a visitor watches a video, or downloads a PDF, or even fills out some forms? The page doesn’t change; therefore Google Analytics doesn’t see it. And what Google Analytics doesn’t see, you don’t see in your data reports.