Marketing Tracking Rescues a Bad Website

Marketing Tracking Rescues a Bad Website

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

This customer had received some State funding for digital marketing, and they were anxious to strut their stuff on Google AdWords. But before they started spending their advertising grant money, I recommended multiple changes to their site. Their response was, “that’s what the other two guys (my competitors) said too.”
 
The business owner claimed the website was “good enough” and just wanted to get started before the State withdrew the grant money (which had no chance of expiring for six months).

The budget was $2,000 per month, so away we went with advertising on Google AdWords.

After the first month, there were no leads, and the dashboard showed these indicators:

Key Indicators from the Dashboard

  • 83% bounce rate (ideal bounce rate is between 40% and 60%)
  • 2 pages/session (ideal is 2–5 pages/session)
  • 48 seconds/session (ideal is 120–240 seconds/session, or 2–4 minutes)
  • 0 sales leads

I recommended we stop advertising and fix the site.  The “The site’s good enough” argument persisted.

Each week after the first month, the data was showing no indication of improvement. After four more weeks (2 full months and $4,000 spent) the owner agreed to stop.

We spent the next month rewriting many pages and restructuring some of the top navigation items. When we resumed the advertising after that month, the dashboard indicators changed dramatically:

  • 53% bounce rate (eventually the bounce rate came under 48%)
  • 7 pages/session
  • 189 seconds/session (3:15 minutes)

Lesson

Getting traffic to your website is one thing, but your website has to be able to generate sales leads (or direct sales for ecommerce sites). If it’s not able to do that, fix the site before advertising.

This post is part of the Dashboard Discoveries Series where customers learn from the Bird’s Eye Marketing’s AdWords and Website reporting dashboard.

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Segmented Google Analytics Audiences: Your Pandora’s Box to Remarketing

Segmented Google Analytics Audiences: Your Pandora’s Box to Remarketing

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

What are your customers doing on your website the first time they visit? Are they looking at specific pages? Putting items into a cart, but not following through with the purchase? Maybe they’re reading your Contact page, but not getting in touch.

That’s ok. Most website visitors don’t become customers right out of the ‘Pandora’s Box,’ so to speak. To convert their interest into a sale, they will need to return to your site.

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Keyword Strategies for Attracting Buyers at Different Buying Stages

Keyword Strategies for Attracting Buyers at Different Buying Stages

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

With all the options and information available online nowadays, few people purchase a product or service immediately after finding it. Instead, they will go through several Buying Stages: Information Search, Evaluation of Alternatives, and Ready to Buy.

Each of these buying stages results in a different ‘Moment of Search,’ which is the moment when someone Googles their problem.

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A Fine Balance: Google’s Remarketing Rules

A Fine Balance: Google’s Remarketing Rules

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

Remarketing can be a powerful incentive to get web users to return to your website or Facebook page after they have visited. Often times, a return visit results in a sale or contact. It’s pretty exciting tool.

But at the risk of being a ‘killjoy’, Google has certain governing rules that need to be followed, or your ads may not show at all. Being aware of these rules before you embark on your remarketing campaign can save you time and money.

Remarketing Governing Rules for All Businesses

There are two main rules governing AdWords: Audience Size and Protecting Privacy:

Audience Size

When you create an audience in Google Analytics, <link to Audience Creation> it must have a minimum of 100 active users in the last 30 days. When you create your audience, Analytics will tell you your audience size.

If you are making a Remarketing List Search Ad (RLSA) campaign, you must have a minimum of 1,000 active users in the last 30 days.

Learn more about audience lists, size, membership, etc.

Your Policy on Audience Privacy

Remarketing ‘follows’ people around the web, and that raises obvious privacy issues that Google takes seriously. If you don’t have a privacy policy, it’s a good idea to create one. Web users are more apt to trust sites that are clear about their data use.

In terms of setting your remarketing privacy policy, yours should basically inform people you are using cookies for Google’s (and other platforms) marketing. Some of the details about this can be found on the ‘Policy requirements for Google Analytics Advertising Features’ page.

Check Before You Build

If you want to avoid having Google stop showing your ads and start sending you warning letters, review the governing rules before you begin your remarketing campaign.

A Case Study in Google’s Remarketing Rules—Personally Identifiable Information

Here’s a policy I wish I had understood before I created the campaign for a client:

MyLiberty.life is an ecommerce business selling incontinence products (diapers, pads, etc.) across Canada. We set up a remarketing audience to get people back on the website after their initial visit, just like I had done for other clients.

However, when MyLiberty’s ads were not being seen by anyone (we had zero impressions), I knew Google was not showing the ads at all and investigated why.

Personally Identifiable Information is a No–No!

It turns out, Google placed MyLiberty Life’s products in the health category, and clicks on remarketing ads may reveal personally identifiable information, or PII (incontinence, special needs children, etc.) about the person clicking. Essentially, ‘when using certain personalized advertising features, additional requirements apply.’

There are several product categories that Google considers revealing PII, including alcohol, gambling, restricted drugs, health, and more. While remarketing is a no-no with these products, you can still actively advertise them on Google.

Look before you create

If you think your product falls into Google’s PII category, check before your start creating remarketing campaigns.

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The Hidden Social Media Hero

The Hidden Social Media Hero

Bird’s Eye Views

A newsletter dedicated to getting your business found on Google

 

It’s always fun to get a nice surprise. For one of my customers, their social media initiatives focused only on Twitter and Linked-In, as that’s what the staff knew. Then, they hired Natalie to work their reception desk. Natalie also happened to be a passionate (some might say addicted) Facebook user, so she started working the business’ Facebook feed.

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